Brooke Caron - RE/MAX Executive Realty| Bellingham, MA Realty, Woonsocket, RI Realty



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A high-performance home is one that operates efficiently, and saves you -- the  homeowner -- significant costs in heating, cooling and more. When it comes time to sell a home of this type, the price point is typically higher -- up to 3.4 percent. High-performance homes are in demand today, and if you've made the necessary upgrades to your home, and are now ready to list it for sale, here's what you can expect in the way of appraisal, listing, showings, offers and sales. 

The Appraisal

Choose your appraiser wisely. The professional you choose should have experience appraising high-performance homes. Because there may not be comparable properties in the area from which to draw, it's important that the person who values your property has all the facts and a firm understanding of exactly how well your home performs. You can also challenge an appraisal if you feel it's too low or that the appraiser didn't take into account all the existing features of your home. 

The Listing

Again, comps -- or properties in the area that are comparable to your own -- are often a problem when it's a high-performance home on the selling block. While they're gaining popularity across the country, these types of homes are still relatively foreign in some areas. 

Don't let lack of comps cause your home's price point to plummet. Partner with your real estate agent to ensure they understand all the energy-efficient and green features of your property. These need to be highlighted in your home's listing, so prospective buyers can see and appreciate them. 

Showing Your High-Performance Home

When it's time for real estate agents to show your home, make sure they're talking up all the green features. You can do this by printing up flyers and having them available inside the home for buyers and their representatives to peruse. You should also make sure you have documentation and proof of all your upgrades on file and ready to produce if someone asks to see them. 

Fielding Offers

Hopefully, once your high-performance home hits the listings, and real estate agents begin bringing their buyers in to tour the property, you'll begin to receive offers. Fielding multiple offers is every home seller's dream, but don't become discouraged if it takes some time to find the right buyer. Even with all the bells and whistles your home has to offer, it's likely priced higher than other properties in the area. 

That's okay. Don't panic and take the first low offer that surfaces. In time, your high-performance home will find the family who appreciates it. 

A high-performance home is a valuable asset in today's world of steadily rising energy costs, but expect the selling process to be a bit more challenging than that of a more traditional home. 

 


This Single-Family in Bellingham, MA recently sold for $300,000. This Ranch style home was sold by Brooke Caron - RE/MAX Executive Realty.


21 Lafayette, Bellingham, MA 02019

Single-Family

$315,000
Price
$300,000
Sale Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
1
Baths
Pretty as a picture and waiting for you! Oozing with curb appeal, this home boasts new vinyl siding, new gutters, decorative window boxes and a freshly paved driveway. This single family ranch home has been lovingly cared for and in the family since 1960 when it was built. Lots of updates inside as well! New windows, a one year old Williamson furnace with an energy efficient hot water heater, newly tiled kitchen/dining room floor, sparkling hardwoods, and fresh paint throughout. A Knotty Pine breezeway leads off of the kitchen to a deck with private backyard as well as an oversized one car garage with remote entry. Located on a dead end street, this property is easily accessible to Rt. 126 and minutes from Rt. 495. Perfect for downsizing or young families starting out, this home should not be missed!

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If you plan to sell your house in the near future, now may be a great time to host a garage sale. That way, you can get rid of excess items, declutter your house and earn extra cash at the same time.

Ultimately, hosting a successful garage sale can be easy – here are three best practices to help you get ready for a garage sale.

1. Organize Your Inventory

A garage sale provides an excellent opportunity to sell a broad range of items – everything from kitchen appliances to gym equipment. As such, you'll want to sort through your belongings and separate must-keep items from those you can live without.

Organize belongings based on where they go in a home – you'll be glad you did. This will enable you to plan ahead for how you'll showcase various items during your garage sale.

Moreover, if you find some items are no longer usable, you should get rid of them altogether. Dispose of any damaged items, and you can immediately remove clutter from your residence.

2. Price Your Items Competitively

One person's junk is another person's treasure, and if you understand the true value of your belongings, you'll be able to price them competitively during a garage sale.

If you plan to sell electronics, jewelry or other high-end items at your garage sale, it often pays to perform research to learn about the true value of these items. Performing an online search of an item will help you see how various sellers around the globe are pricing the same item. Or, you can always contact local retailers directly for expert pricing insights as well.

In addition, consider the age and condition of an item before you price it. If an item looks brand new and performs great, you may be able to earn a significant profit from it. On the other hand, if an item shows signs of aging, you may want to lower your pricing expectations.

3. Promote Your Garage Sale to the Right Audience

Create flyers that you can post around your neighborhood to promote your garage sale. These flyers should include information about the date, time and location of your garage sale, thereby making it easy for those who see the flyers to find your event.

Don't forget to post details about your garage sale online too. Share information about your garage sale with family members and friends on social networks, and you should no trouble stirring up plenty of interest in your event.

Lastly, if you're planning to sell your house and need help getting your residence show-ready, you may want to consult with a real estate agent.

A real estate agent can offer expert tips to help you declutter your residence and ensure that your house is an attractive option to homebuyers. Furthermore, a real estate agent may even be able to help you prep for a garage sale, increasing the likelihood that you can make this event an instant success.


One aspect of house hunting that some prospective home buyers overlook is security. Perhaps it's because they're looking at homes in "nice neighborhoods, where you shouldn't have to worry about that sort of thing happening." Maybe another reason they're paying little or no attention to security issues is that they're more preoccupied with the layout of the kitchen, the size of the backyard, and the condition of the master bathroom.

Even though there are dozens of details to compare and think about when you're house hunting, security features are important enough to include in your checklist. By letting your real estate agent know that home security is a high priority for you, they'll hopefully point out security features that they notice and perhaps ask the listing agent for any additional information on things like installed alarms systems, deadbolt locks, or security lighting on the property.

As a side note, if the present owner has recently installed an extensive security system in the house, you can also use that as an opportunity (excuse) to inquire about crime in the neighborhood and whether there have been any recent incidents in the area. Additional research may need to be done to ferret out that information.

As you check out different houses that your buyers' agent shows you, here are a few security-related checkpoints to keep in mind:

  • Do the doors look solid and are they secured by deadbolt locks?
  • Do first-floor windows have functional and securely locking mechanisms?
  • Are there any outside floodlights, lamp posts, and/or other forms of illumination around the house?
  • Are there any overgrown bushes next to the house that could conceal a burglar's attempt to enter the house through a window?
  • Are there any fences on the premises that might discourage a burglar from entering the property?
  • Do the main entrances have locking storm doors that provide an extra layer of security?
  • Are there any other security vulnerabilities that you or your real estate agent think need addressing, either now or in the immediate future?
While that list may not include every possible security feature and potential weakness to look for when touring homes for sale, it will hopefully heighten your awareness about the need to prioritize home security -- even before you actually close on a house and move in.

When you do find the ultimate house for you and your family, it's always a good idea to change the locks on all external doors as soon as possible. You never know how many duplicate keys have been circulated over the years to contractors, neighbors, cleaning people, pet sitters, house sitters, and family members. One way to take control of your new home's security situation is to make sure there are no extra house keys floating around in the hands of people you don't know.



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