Brooke Caron - RE/MAX Executive Realty| Bellingham, MA Realty, Woonsocket, RI Realty


Selling a home should be a fast, easy process. However, challenges may arise that prevent you from quickly selling your house and maximizing your property sale earnings. And if you fail to plan ahead for the home selling journey, these challenges may get the best of you.

Ultimately, there are several things you need to know before you list your residence, such as:

1. The housing market fluctuates constantly.

The housing market in your city or town may change frequently. Fortunately, if you allocate time and resources to analyze the local housing sector, you can determine if a buyer's or seller's market is currently in place and prepare accordingly.

In a buyer's market, there may be an abundance of quality houses that sell within weeks or months of their initial listing dates. Comparatively, in a seller's market, there may be a shortage of first-rate residences, and the best houses generally will sell shortly after they are listed.

To determine if a buyer's or seller's market is in effect, you should find out how quickly houses are selling in your city or town. You also should assess how your house stacks up against comparable residences that are currently available. With this housing market data in hand, you may be better equipped than ever before to succeed during the home selling journey, regardless of the current real estate sector's conditions.

2. Your home's curb appeal may have far-flung effects on your property selling experience.

How your home looks to buyers may dictate your house selling success. For instance, if your residence boasts amazing curb appeal, it may generate lots of interest from prospective buyers. On the other hand, if your house fails to impress buyers when they see it for the first time, your residence may linger on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

For a home seller, it often is beneficial to upgrade a residence's curb appeal. Because if you mow the lawn, trim the hedges and perform other home exterior upgrades, you could differentiate your residence from other available houses. As such, you could stir up significant interest in your home.

3. Working with a real estate agent may help you speed up the house selling journey.

A real estate agent is crucial for a home seller, as this housing market professional can offer expert insights into the property selling journey. If you need help establishing a competitive initial asking price for your residence, for example, a real estate agent is ready to assist you. Or, if you want to sell your home as quickly as possible, a real estate agent can help you do just that.

As you get set to list your residence, you should plan ahead. If you start preparing for the house selling journey today, you could enter the real estate market as a property selling expert. As a result, you could reap the benefits of a quick, profitable house selling experience.


Whether prepping your home for sale or just wanting a fresh new look, you don't need to redo the whole house completely. Instead, change out a few critical pieces for something more modern or timeless. Here are a few ways to bring your dated home into the Twenty-first Century.

  • Wall paint: Okay, this one is an easy decision, but, don’t just repaint the same old way. Instead, give each wall a slightly different shade of the same hue to create a dramatic effect. Even neutrals like gray and taupe come in a vast variety of colors. Pick one for your main wall, then one with twenty-five percent white, and then one with fifty percent white for a simple version. In the kitchen, paint above the cabinets a darker shade than the walls to give the appearance of depth and dimension. If you have architectural alcoves or niches, give them the deeper shade. Nothing says so-last-year like chalkboard walls and stencils. Keep the blank slate in the kid’s playroom and update your kitchen with a sophisticated adult color.
  • Ceiling paint: If your ceiling still has the contractor color (the same as the walls), consider changing it up with a bright white. White with a hint of blue reflects light with a more natural sunlight color while white that leans slightly creamy gives the room a warm glow. 
  •  Smooth ceilings: If your home has popcorn ceilings, an immediate update comes with scraping off the texture and smoothing the plaster. Before you begin this project, however, check with a professional to see if your ceiling's surface contains asbestos. If that's the case, you'll need to hire certified asbestos abatement to remove the existing ceiling.
  • Stair railings: Nothing dates a house like an elaborate wood railing with turned spindles or an iron railing with curls and swoops. Swap out the existing one for a simple, yet classic style that spans the decades.
  • White appliances: While moderately expensive, changing out white devices for stainless steel moves your kitchen into the current decade and won't look too out of place with the rest of the kitchen. But, if you're going to upgrade the entire kitchen, go one step further with graphite, blue-gray, or slate units, in high gloss or matte finishes.

If you’re curious about what trends are popular in your neighborhood, visit open houses to see what others are doing, and check with your local realtor.


This Single-Family in Woonsocket, RI recently sold for $260,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Brooke Caron - RE/MAX Executive Realty.


149 capwell AV, Woonsocket RI, 02895

Single-Family

$260,000
Price
$260,000
Sale Price

7
Numberof Rooms
3
Beds Total
1/1
Full/Half Baths
This well maintained home is nicely located in a desirable neighborhood in the Bernon area. A few of the many features include a front to back great room open to the fully appliance kitchen with snack bar. Maintenance free vinyl siding and windows and recent roof are a few major improvements. A few other features are central air, underground irrigation, 1st floor laundry, and 2 car garage.Nice family home close to all amenities.

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No doubt about it, one of the joys of home-ownership is making your abode reflect your personality. You’ve added an accent feature here and faux finishes there, trendy geometric shutters and some personal landscaping art reflect your funky nature.

You thought this was your forever home and didn’t worry about what anyone else might think about it … but now, you’re moving on and you’re worried your expressive nature might derail your home sale. Take a moment to assess which of your personal touches should stay with the house and which ones might detract from a potential buyer.

Exterior colors: Many newer communities have color requirements for a home’s exterior, so as long as your home falls in line with the requirements, you won’t need to make any changes. In older neighborhoods, however, there may be no such restrictions. If yours is a particularly bright or stand-out color, you may want to tone it down to blend in more with your neighbors. A better option for attracting buyers includes an exterior free of mold and stains and freshly painted trim. While painted brick is all the rage on home renovation shows, if your brick is not painted, just make sure it is clean. If it is painted, but the paint is tired, chipped or faded, consider giving it a new coat.

Exterior décor: Trendy patio hangings, gazing balls, gnomes and birdbaths added to the pleasure you took in enjoying your outdoor space. A buyer with a simpler aesthetic might find these additions distracting. A better option for attracting buyers is curb appeal based on clean landscaping, perennial plants, and flora that doesn’t require a lot of maintenance. This provides a cleaner canvas for the new buyer’s personal creativity. You can express your personality with a brightly painted front door, an easy fix for a homebuyer to change.

Overgrown landscaping: Depending on the age of your home, and the length of time you’ve lived there, the landscaping may need to be scaled back. Larger trees that have grown up near the foundation may cause potential buyer concerns about the costly foundation and structural repairs. Brick walls covered in ivy are beautiful but may make a buyer wonder about what’s hidden under all those leaves. Consult with an arborist about trimming back trees and if you have concerns about the foundation, get it inspected to avoid any nasty contingencies at closing time.

Water features: Of course, some locations demand a pool for summer entertaining, while in other areas a pool or hot tub is entirely optional. It doesn’t make any sense to fill in an in-ground pool unless it no longer functions, but above-ground pools can detract from a sale. Hot tubs in less-than-pristine condition can give some buyers pause, while Koi ponds, fountain and other water features may either enhance or detract from your buying demographic. Check with your real estate professional to see what is true in your area.

Try to walk around the exterior of your home with a critical eye:

  • Do some fencing panels need replacing? Gate hinges?
  • Check the exterior knobs. Do they all match? Are they keyed the same?
  • Are windows cracked or do any have broken seals—do they have condensation inside when the temperatures outside and inside differ?
  • Carriage and porch lights often get neglected. While you may not need to replace them, make certain they are clean and functional.

Ask a professional for guidance with questions about the exterior appeal of your home and the best practices for your home's future sale.


Do you find yourself searching through your closet for a big event and still feel like you have nothing to wear? It may be time to filter through the wardrobe you've acquired and rid your closet of things you just don't wear anymore.

What should I keep? 

Going through the years of clothes you’ve collected can be a week-long task. Start by filtering through your possessions in sections. Start with shoes, then shirts, and so on. Although it may be time-consuming, consider trying on each item and looking at yourself in the mirror. Some of the things you're holding onto may not even fit you anymore. If it no longer fits or is no longer your style, toss it in a donation bag.

Another thing to be on the look for is damage. Does a piece have a stain, a missing button, or a small tear? If so, it's time to let go of it. You should also think back to the last time the item you wore it. If you haven't used the outfit in the past year, it's most likely time to let go.

Breaking the attachment. 

You may be holding onto a particular item in hopes of having an occasion to wear it. Keeping "just in case" things can take up space in your closet that you could utilize for pieces you can use regularly. Eliminate unused pieces by only keeping one outfit per occasion. You can also minimalize your wardrobe by only keeping items that are versatile. For example, keep clothing items that can be dressed up or worn casually. Choose to keep clothing items that are colors you’re already comfortable wearing. If it makes you uncomfortable when you try it on, it'll most likely stay hidden away in your closet. Break the attachment on clothing you hope to wear one day by keeping items you genuinely love seeing on yourself.

The Maybe Box. 

Purging your closest of unworn items may be scary because at one point in your life you've gotten rid of something and then later regretted it. If you're having a hard time letting go of an item because of fear of missing it, create a maybe box. Toss these types of articles into a box and set a deadline on when to get rid of them. For example, set a deadline for two months from now. If you do not think of any of these items in that period, then it's time to say goodbye to them. If you do happen to reach for a particular item in the box, then keep it. 

Saying goodbye to clothing you've accumulated over the years can be tough. We sometimes feel an attachment to clothing because of the memories associated with them. By getting rid of old items, you're making room for making new memories. If you're having a hard time filtering through your closet, call a local professional home organizer in your area for assistance.




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